Sunday, July 14, 2013

What "tragedy"?



From the moment the Zimmerman case broke until the last talking head called it quits late Sunday night, we have endlessly heard what has become one of the most erroneously used, overworked words in the English language: “tragedy.” And we have not nearly heard the end of its use.

It was said by almost everyone, including Zimmerman and his defense team, that what happened on that rainy night was a tragedy. For race relations, the rule of law, Sanford, Florida, the United States— even for the world. And, of course, a tragedy for Trayvon Martin’s family, relatives, friends, acquaintances, bros, pals in the hood, and, unmentioned, a bunch of unsavory characters.

And most of all, of course, it was a “tragedy” for Trayvon Martin.

According to the Encarta Dictionary, a “tragedy” is a “very sad event, an event in life that evokes feelings of sorrow or grief, a disastrous circumstance or event . . . .”

When a juiced-up young punk ambushes a smaller, weaker victim, sucker punches him, threatens death, and bangs his head on concrete, and is shot to death in return, what has occurred is not a “very sad event, an event in life that evokes feelings of sorrow or grief, a disastrous circumstance or event.”

It is justice!